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Carl Gutierrez-Jones - Acting Director for the 1999-2000 acedemic year
Mario T. Garcia Raymond Huerta Chela Sandoval
Arturo Aldama Luis Leal Denise A. Segura
Barbara Herr Harthorn Francisco A. Lomeli Stephen Trejo
Maria Herrera-Sobek Fernando Lopez-Alves Inés Talamantez

Center for Chicano Studies Researchers



Mario T. Garcia is Professor of History and Chicano Studies at UCSB. He is the author of several books including "Desert Immigrants: The Mexicans of El Paso, 1880-1920; Mexican Americans: Leadership, Ideology & Identity, 1930-1960"; "Memories of Chicano History: The Life and Narrative of Bert Corona; Ruben Salazar-Border Correspondent: Selected Writings, 1955-1970"; and "The Making of a Mexican American Mayor: Raymond L. Telles of El Paso." He is the Director of the Latino Leadership Project and the Research Liason between the Department of Chicano Studies and the Center for Chicano Studies.

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Carl Gutierrez-Jones is Associate Professor of English and the Program in Comparative Literature at UCSB. He is the Co-Principal Investigator of the Center for Chicano Studies' program in "Laboring Toward the 21st Century: Interdisciplinary Research on the Chicana/o and Latina/o Working Poor. He is also the Principal Investigator & Coordinator of the interdisciplinary seminar for faculty across the nation on "The Routes of Culture: Chicana/o Arts in an Age of Displacement." He developed and produced the unique internet site, "Affirmative Action and Diversity Project: A Web Site for Research" (http://humanitas.ucsb.edu/aa.html).

Dr. Gutierrez-Jones is the author of Rethinking the Borderlands: Between Chicano Culture and Legal Discourse (1995), and has numerous written essays on the New Western History, the color-blindness movement, border theory, and the rhetoric of racial injury. He is currently completing a book entited Injury by Design which considers current debates about race, racism and affirmative action.

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Barbara Herr Harthorn Barbara Herr Harthorn is the Director of Social Science Research Development for the Office of Research at the University of California. She is the Co-Director of the Center for Global Studies, Institute for Social, Behavioral and Economic Research. She serves on the Center for Chicano Studies Advisory Committee. Dr. Harthorn's research and publication areas focus on maternal and newborn health among Mexican farmworkers in California.

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Maria Hererra-Sobek Maria Herrera-Sobek, Professor of Chicano Studies, is the Luis Leal Endowed Chair at UCSB and the Associate Director of the Center for Chicano Studies. She is co-organizing the East/West Chicano Institute to be held at Cornell University in conjunction with UCSB' Center for Chicano Studies. A renowned literary critic, poet, and folklore specialist, Dr. Herrera Sobek has published numerous books, articles and scholarly essays. Her books include:"The Bracero Experience: Elite Lore versus Folklore"; "Northward Bound: The Mexican Immigrant Experience in Ballad and Song"; and "The Mexican Corrido: A Feminist Analysis."

She has edited several volumes including: "Chicana Creativity and Criticism"; "Culture Across Borders"; "Mexican Immigration and Popular Culture"; Chicana Writers on Word and Film"; "Saga de Mexico"; and "Reconstructing a Hispanic/Chicano Literary Heritage."

Currently Dr. Herrera-Sobek is working on an anthology on narco-corridos and a book on contemporary critical theories and corridos as well as a volume on on chicana writers.

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Raymond Huerta Raymond Huerta, J.D. is Affirmative Action Coordinator at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Lecturer in the Department of Chicano Studies. As the Interim Director of the UCSB/Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico, he is involved in developing Mexican Studies at the Center for Chicano Studies and the Department of Chicano Studies. Mr. Huerta's research focuses on the civil rights of Chicanos/Latinos in the U.S.. 


Luis Leal Luis Leal is Professor Emeritus (University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana), now Visiting Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His extensive published works have been compiled in "Luis Leal: A Bibliography with Interpretative and Critical Essays" (1988). Among his most recent books are "Aztlan y Mexico and No Longer Voiceless" (1995). In 1991 he received the Aztec Eagle from the Mexican Government and in 1997, the National Humanities Medal from President Clinton. In 1988, he was made a member of the Academia Norteamericana de la Lengual Espanola, and also a corresponding member of the Academia Espanola. 

Professor Leal's research interests are centered around the history of Chicanas/os and Latinas/os writers. He has studied the authorship of the first novel published in Spanish in the United States (Jicotencal, Philadelphia, 1826), and the literature about Joaquin Murrieta. 

In association with Professor Victor Fuentes, Professor of Spanish at Portuguese at UCSB, he edits the literary periodical, Ventana Abierta: Revista latina de Literatura, Arte y Cultura. This publication is sponsored by the Center of Chicano Studies, UCSB. 

Professor Leal teaches classes in the Department of Chicano Studies at UCSB and is an ex oficio member of the Center for Chicano Studies Advisory Committee.

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Francisco A. Lomeli Francisco A. Lomeli is Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and in the Department of Chicano Studies where he serves as Chair. He is a member of the Center for Chicano Studies Advisory Committee and Co-Principal Investigator of the program in "Laboring Toward the 21st Century: Interdisciplinary Research on the Chicana/o and Latina/o Working Poor." Dr. Lomeli has published a number of works on both Chicano and Latin American literature. His specializations range from narratology to literary history, including translations (i.e. Barrio on the Edge by Alejandro Morales). Among his publications are 'La novelistica de Carlos Droguett: Poetica de la obsesion y el martirio' (l983), '"andbook of Hispanic Cultures in the U.S.: Art and Literature" (l993), and "Dictionary of Literary biography; Chicano Writers" (l989 & l993). 

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Fernando Lopez-Alves is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also the Director of UCSB's University of California in Washington D.C. (UCDC) Program. Dr. Lopez-Alves is the author of The Origins of Democracy and State Formation in the Americas, Duke University Press (in press), 617 pp. His research utilizes a comparative historical methodology to analyze the formations of democracies and other state formations in Latin America.

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Chela Sandoval Chela Sandoval is Assistant Professor of Critical and Cultural Theory for the Department of Chicano Studies at UCSB. She also serves on the Advisory Committee of the Center for Chicano Studies. Dr. Sandoval is a member of the History of Consciousness School of Cultural Theory, and a participant in the Women of Color Cohort. Sandoval's writings have had wide formal and informal circulation. 

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Denise Segura Denise A. Segura is the Director of the Center for Chicano Studies and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Most of her research and publications have analyzed Chicanas/Mexicanas and employment stratification as well as the intersection of family and work. In collaboration with Beatriz Pesquera, UC Davis, she is writing a book tentatively titled, "Malinche Speaks: Chicana Feminism as Heresy and Empowerment." 

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Stephen Tejo Stephen Trejo is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He serves on the Center for Chicano Studies Advisory Committee and will be the Associate Director in January 1999. Dr. Trejo is the author of numerous articles concerning the status and mobility of Mexican Americans in the U.S. labor market. 

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Ines Talamantez Inés Talamantez is Associate Professor of Native American Religious Studies and Managing Editor of New Scholar: An Americanist Review. She has written two books on Native American oral traditions and has just completed a manuscripted titled "'Isánáklésh Gotal: Introducing Apache Girls to the World of Spiritual and Cultural Values." She has written numerous articles on women, religious studies, and environmental studies. She is a frequent lecturer at conferences and universities. Her major research interests contemporary Native American religious traditions and philosophies, Mexican studies, Chicana/o studies, and environmental studies.

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