Fall 2013


PROFILES in RESEARCH


UCSB Researchers are Making a Difference in ...






What's new in Fall 2013

 

OUR NOBEL LAUREATES



Finn E. Kydland, 2004 Nobel Prize in Economics FINN E. KYDLAND
Professor of Economics
2004 Nobel Prize in Economics


David J. Gross, 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics DAVID J. GROSS
Director, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics
2004 Nobel Prize in Physics

Alan J. Heeger, 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry ALAN J. HEEGER
Professor of Physics and of Materials
2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry


Herbert Kroemer, 2000 Nobel Prize in Physics HERBERT KROEMER
Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Materials
2000 Nobel Prize in Physics

Walter Kohn, 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry WALTER KOHN
Founding Director, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics
Research Professor of Physics
1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry


Contract and Grant Highlights

Assistant Professor in Chemistry Receives $1 Million to Study the Emergence and Evolution of Biomolecules

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Irene Chen, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, received a one-million dollar grant from the Simons Foundation  to support her work on the origins of life.

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Contracts and Grant Highlights

Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration Receives Grant to Digitize Specimens

with a one-year Museums for America grant awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), CCBER scholars will digitize more than 70,000 specimens in the center's vascular plant collection. The funds will be used to improve databasing workflows, increase efficiency and speed, and complete the data entry of the remaining 80 percent of specimens that have yet to be digitized. - See more at: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2013/013631/plant-specimens-go-digital#sthash.UBCZv844.dpuf

CCBER received a one-year Museums for America grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to digitize more than 70,000 specimens in the center's vascular plant collection. The funds will be used to improve databasing workflows, increase efficiency and speed, and complete the data entry of the remaining 80 percent of specimens that have yet to be digitized.

» Read More